Miscellaneous Offences

4.6.0.L8 Updated on:5 November 2021

Common nuisance

The most obvious offence is that of a person urinating in a public place, committing a public nuisance.

Statutory Offences

Any person who commits a nuisance in or against any Post Office letter box commits an offence.

Any person who commits a nuisance in or against any telephone box commits an offence.

An act tending to effect public mischief is an offence in Common Law such as making a false allegation of an offence to the Police, causing Police time to be wasted making enquiries, making a false statement of danger to persons and causing distress.

Any person who by means of a public telecommunications service sends a message of a grossly offensive, indecent, obscene or menacing character, commits an offence.

Any person who makes use of a public telecommunications service to send a false message for the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to another commits an offence.

Begging

It is an offence at Common Law to unlawfully solicit the giving of money.

Charities are lawfully entitled to hold street collections under a permit issued by the Bailiff.

Impersonation of a Police Officer

It is an offence for any person, with intent to deceive, to impersonate a Police Officer or to do any act or make any statement calculated to falsely suggest that he is a Police Officer.

Police Officer means a member of the States of Jersey Police and the Honorary Police.

It is an offence for any person who, not being a Police Officer, wears any article of Police uniform in circumstances where it gives him an appearance so nearly resembling that of a Police Officer as to be calculated to deceive.

It is an offence for any person who, not being a Police Officer, has in his possession any article of Police uniform, unless he proves that he obtained possession lawfully and for a lawful purpose.